Frequently Asked Questions

Keeping you informed about...

Heart Disease Screening
(Prevention, Procedures, Coronary Artery Computerized Tomography & Calcium Scoring Exam)

Lung Cancer Screening
(Detection, Radiation, Results and What to Expect)

Breast Cancer Screening
(Prevention, Procedures, Contrast Enhanced Breast MRI)

Exam Preparations: What to know.

How will my referring physician obtain the results of my exam(s)?

What is Virtual Colonoscopy?

Templeton Imaging accepts all major insurances with the exception of CCPN and Medi-Cal.

For further answers to your questions not listed here, please call (805) 434-1491 today.

Heart Disease Screening

What is Heart Disease?

Heart disease is a result of the build-up of atherosclerotic "plaque" along the lining of the blood vessels which supply the heart muscle. When this plaque causes a significant narrowing of the blood vessels, people have symptoms of chest pain or "angina," because there is insufficient quantity of blood flowing to the heart muscle to supply its needs. Even before this occurs however, the early build-up of plaque puts a person at risk for a heart attack. This is because plaque can be "unstable," and if it ruptures, the arteries can become blocked, resulting in complete disruption of blood supply to a portion of heart muscle.

Who is at Risk for Heart Disease?

Men 45 or older, women 55 or older with a sedentary lifestyle, elevated cholesterol levels, chronically elevated stress levels, a family history of heart disease, elevated blood pressure, diabetes, and/or a history of smoking.

What is a Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring Exam?

Using a state-of-the-art Multislice Spiral CT scanner, the heart and the coronary arteries are imaged. Using sophisticated computer software, we are able to image and determine the amount of calcification in the coronary arteries. This allows for a precise quantification of the extent of atherosclerotic plaque build-up, which might exist in the coronary arteries.

Is Coronary Artery Computerized Tomography Risky, Painful or Time Consuming?

No. The procedure takes less than ten minutes. It is entirely non-invasive, pain-free, requires no needles, and no exercise. If you take medications, there is no need to alter your usual prescription (or take any additional medications) for the examination. It is not necessary to fast prior to the scan.

What Does the Tomography Procedure Involve?

You will be asked to lie down on your back on the CT scanning table. Our technologists will place EKG electrodes on your chest. In less than 10 minutes, the examination is completed, and you may resume your normal routine. The radiologist will interpret your images and will calculate a calcium score for your coronary arteries. This score is matched against other people of your gender and age group. This information is then promptly transmitted to your physician and discussed with you.

How Can Coronary Artery CT and Calcium Scoring Reduce my Risk of Heart Attack?

In order to prevent heart attacks, the first step is to know if you have coronary artery disease. With the information this test provides, your physician will have an understanding of the extent of atherosclerotic build-up there is in your coronary arteries. He or she can then recommend appropriate treatment, including diet and lifestyle changes, medication or further diagnostic testing. It has been shown that these recommendations, when applied to patients early and appropriately, can reduce a patient's risk of heart attack by as much as 30%!

How is Coronary Artery CT Different than Other Available Tests?

Is Coronary Artery Disease Treatable?

Yes. The plaque build-up process can be slowed, stabilized and reversed through dietary and lifestyle modifications and through appropriate medical regimens. This must be done with the guidance of your physician.

Who Should Undergo Coronary Artery Computerized Tomography?

Based upon through review of the medical literature, coronary artery computerized tomography provides useful information for the following patients:

Lung Cancer Screening

Why is there a Need for Improved Lung Cancer Detection?

There were an estimated 160,000 deaths from lung cancer in the United States in 1998 with an estimated 172,000 new cases diagnosed. Despite understanding that the main risk factor, tobacco, is known for the development of lung cancer, the prognosis for the disease remains dismal. The overall cure rate of lung cancer is approximately 12%, but the cure rate for Stage I cancers is 70-80%. Any lung cancer screening method that can safely detect a large number of potentially curable Stage I lung cancers is an exciting public health development.

What Methods are Available for the Detection of Early Lung Cancer?

Screening protocols based on chest x-rays and sputum cytology are relatively insensitive in the detection of small, potentially curable Stage 1 lung cancers. Computed tomography (CT) is unequivocally more sensitive than chest x-ray in detecting small potentially curable lung cancers and other kinds of parenchymal lung disease.

What Scientific Studies Have Been Done to Evaluate this Test?

Until recently, most scientific studies examining lung cancer screening documented negative results. Although poor design and other flaws probably beset these studies conducted in the 1970's, they were performed before computed tomography (CT) became widely available in the 1980's. In the July 1999 Lancet, there was published a landmark scientific study (Early Lung Cancer Action Project or ELCAP) which demonstrated that CT can greatly improve the likelihood of discovering small potentially curable Stage 1 lung cancers in a high-risk patient group (heavy tobacco users) when compared to chest x-ray. In this study, CT detected three times as many non-calcified pulmonary nodules as chest x-ray in the study group and CT detected six times as many Stage I cancers as chest x-rays. In addition, the malignant nodules detected on CT were significantly smaller than those detected on chest x-ray. This is very important because the smaller the tumor size the more likely it is a curable Stage 1 cancer. Indeed, approximately 70-80% of Stage 1 lung cancers are curable, compared to an overall 12% cure rate for all lung cancers. In the ELCAP patient group, non-calcified pulmonary nodules were detected in 23% of the screening CT exams compared to only 7% of the chest x-rays performed in the same patients. Malignant disease was detected in 2.7% by CT scanning and in only 0.7% by chest x-rays. Stage 1 cancers were detected in 2.3% by CT and 0.4% by chest x-ray. Further studies are necessary to confirm the cure rate of Stage I cancers identified by this method and compare it to other available survival data, to further refine low-dose screening CT recommendations in high-risk patients, and to document the cost-effectiveness of this method.

Who Should Consider Undergoing Lung Cancer Screening?

Patients should discuss this issue with their personal physicians. Any patient who is at increased risk for developing lung cancer and is currently undergoing periodic screening chest x-rays should consider undergoing low-dose screening chest CT because of its superior ability to detect small pulmonary nodules. The high-risk patient group studied in the ELCAP study consisted of men and women over the age of 60 with at least 10 pack-years (one pack per day for 10 years).

What Type of Machine is Required to Perform this Test?

This exam must be performed on a spiral (helical) CT scanner. Spiral CT is more accurate than routine chest x-ray in detecting tiny nodules, and compared to conventional non-spiral CT scanners, a spiral scanner can image the entire lung with minimal radiation using a single breath hold.

How is Low-Dose Screening CT Different from Diagnostic Chest CT?

Low-Dose Spiral Screening CT is designed to replace the chest x-ray in screening asymptomatic patients for pulmonary nodules. The low-dose technique is ideal to evaluate the lung parenchyma for nodules, but is not intended to screen for abnormalities elsewhere in the chest, such as the aorta, heart, lymph nodes, or bones. Like screening mammography, it is important to minimize the amount of radiation exposure in asymptomatic patients. No intravenous contrast is used. Like many other screening tests, many insurance companies will not pay for this exam, although in the future in high-risk patients this situation will hopefully change. The cost of a Low-Dose Screening CT exam is less than half of that for a Diagnostic Chest CT exam. Diagnostic Spiral Chest CT scans are almost always performed to further evaluate an abnormal finding on chest x-ray or to evaluate the chest in certain specific disease conditions. Unlike a low-dose screening exam, which evaluates only the lung parenchymal tissue, a diagnostic exam images all tissues in the chest (aorta, lymph nodes, airway, bones, etc.) and often requires intravenous contrast.

How Much Radiation Does a Patient Receive From a Low-Dose Screening CT exam?

The radiation from a low-dose screening CT exam is very minimal and is approximately equal to that received from a standard chest x-ray or from flying in a commercial jet across the country. What does the procedure involve? On the day of the exam after registering at the front desk, the patient will be asked to complete a brief lung cancer risk factor questionnaire. Then, the patient lies down on the Spiral CT scanner table and is positioned for the exam by the technologist. No intravenous line or contrast is needed. The patient holds his or her breath and the table will move through the gantry of the CT scanner while images of the lungs are taken. In approximately 20 seconds, the exam is complete.

What Kind of Results Can Be Expected?

A "negative" result means that there are no nodules detected. Patients should discuss with their physician when they should return for a repeat exam. Although there is not uniform agreement on how often repeat screening CT should be performed, patients at high risk for lung cancer should consider undergoing this exam on a yearly basis. A "positive" result will be any patient with one or more pulmonary nodules. In this event, a patient may be asked to come back for a diagnostic CT chest exam, which examines all tissues in the chest, not just the lung parenchyma, and which may be performed with intravenous contrast. A diagnostic CT chest exam only takes slightly longer than a screening exam and is performed to confirm the results of the screening exam. In addition, additional thin slices may be taken of the nodule or nodules to determine the presence of calcium or fat, which is often seen in benign nodules. In addition, you may be given intravenous contrast material for your diagnostic CT scan, which may help distinguish a benign nodule from a malignant one. Just because a nodule is found does not mean that you have lung cancer. Depending on the results of the diagnostic spiral CT scan and after conferring with your personal physician, you may be referred to a lung specialist for bronchoscopically guided needle biopsy or to an interventional radiologist for percutaneous fine needle biopsy of your nodule. In many cases, when the nodule is too small to be biopsied, you may be asked to return in 3 or 6 months for another spiral CT scan that will precisely determine whether or not there is growth in the nodule.

Why Should Patients Have Their Low-Dose Screening CT Exams at Templeton Imaging?

Templeton Imaging has the only 64 slice CT Scanner in North San Luis Obispo County. The Radiologists and staff of Templeton Imaging are well recognized for their leadership, imaging expertise, and innovation in the local medical community.

Breast Cancer Screening

Breast MRI

This is the latest, most advanced, and most exciting advance in breast imaging care in the past twenty years. Breast MRI offers women many advantages. Although this technique is relatively new, scientific studies in the past decade suggest that this method is more accurate than all other breast cancer detection methods. Scientific studies thus far indicate that it is more likely to find cancer when present and less likely to lead to a falsely positive exam compared to mammography. It requires no breast ionizing radiation (x-ray), requires no breast compression, and can depict the entire breast, even in women with breast implants.

What is the exact accuracy of Breast MRI?

The answer is not completely known, and clearly will ultimately vary depending on local professional expertise, technical quality, and the patient population that is studied. The preponderance of scientific literature, however, suggests an overall sensitivity of 90-98% and specificity as high as 93% (ranging from about 50-93%), figures that far exceed mammography, clinical exam, or any other known technique. It is important to note that studies thus far performed have been directed at women with breast cancer and/or high genetic risk. The accuracy of breast MRI in the general population is not established. In many women, clinically and sonographically equivocal lesions not visible on mammograms were characterized as benign with MRI, thereby allowing biopsy to be avoided in favor of clinical follow-up. Introducing Elective Breast MRI.

We also offer diagnostic breast MRI as a problem-solving tool. Conservative indications include:

Physicians and other caregivers must recognize that patient questions about breast MRI are rapidly increasing as local and national media cover this important advance. Important facts women should know about breast MRI and breast care include:

How will my referring physician obtain the results of my exam(s)?

Templeton Imaging will automatically fax the results a patient’s exam to their referring physician as soon as they are completed. If the patient wants to personally receive the results from Templeton Imaging, they must fill out the Patient Records Release Form (link) and we will send them to the patient directly. Please note if there’s an abnormal finding in the exam, one of our radiologists will contact the patient’s physician directly.

What is Virtual Colonoscopy?

The American Cancer Society recommends that people over 50 undergo colon cancer examinations every five to 10 years. This new, non-invasive method of examining the colon screens for pre-cancerous polyps and early cancer without the discomfort of a scope. It's a quick, pain-free alternative to the traditional barium enema. Those with a family history of colon cancer have been advised to begin screenings as early as 35. Virtual colonoscopy uses a CT scanner to take a series of X-ray of the colon and a computer to create a 3-D view. A small tube is inserted in the rectum to inflate the colon so it can be more easily viewed. A Radiologist then checks the images for suspicious polyps. Since the patient isn’t sedated, there is no recovery time required. But if any polyps need to be removed, the patient must then have a regular colonoscopy to do that. It is possible in some instances that your insurance will pay for this exam.